Completed Projects

Mobilization on Food Security and Community Economic Development

2005 – 2011

Background

Mobilization on Food Security and Community Economic Development, was one of six research clusters (sub nodes) that were part of the federally-funded Atlantic Social Economy and Sustainability (SES) Research Network (part of the national Canadian Social Economy Research Partnerships project), which worked to broaden knowledge about the social economy of the Atlantic region. The social economy can mean different things to different people, but in a general sense it means putting “people before profits” and allowing community organizations to prioritize social objectives and social values through democratic means.

From 2005-2011, Sub Node Three (SN3) focused on developing partnerships and laying the foundation for participatory action research (PAR) projects on community mobilization on food security and community economic development (CED) in Kings, Hants and Annapolis counties of Nova Scotia. The SN3 partnership brought together both academic and community partners committed to improving community food security (CFS).

Projects and Activities

Logo - SES Research Network

SES Research Network

With the help of a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada as part of the Canadian Social Economy Research Partnership (CSERP), the Atlantic Social Economy and Sustainability Research Network (September 2005 to June 2011) conducted and shared research that reflected the interests and concerns of community partners on issues relating to sustainability and the social economy.

The social economy can mean different things to different people, but in a general sense it means putting “people before profits” and allowing community organizations to prioritize social objectives and social values through democratic means.

Led by Dr. Leslie Brown, anthropologist at Mount Saint Vincent University, the Atlantic Network was one of six Canadian Social Economy Research Partnership regional nodes across Canada. Each individual or organization involved in the Network contributed their complementary strengths, networks, and tremendous depth and breadth of experience in social economy research and practice in Atlantic Canada and abroad. Partners include self-defined community economic development organizations, non-profits, service sector organizations and co-operatives of a local, regional and national scope.

Over the course of the project, the initial collaboration of over 80 social economy practitioners, academics, collaborating institutions, government agencies, and community partners expanded, growing to over 200 committed community and research partners!

Working in six research clusters and a Node office at Mount Saint Vincent University, and across 65 projects, the Atlantic SESRN pursued the goals of contributing to:

  • The theory and practice of the social economy in Atlantic Canada;
  • Internal bridging, bonding, and capacity building within the Social Economy and the academy;
  • The use of the term “social economy” as a policy-relevant framing concept in the region; and
  • Linking Atlantic partners (community and university-based) with others in Canada & the world.

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